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Monthly Archives: December 2021

July’s Nonresidential Construction Starts -3% M/M, +11% Y/Y, & -7% YTD

ConstructConnect announced today that July 2021’s volume of construction starts, excluding residential work, was $37.6 billion (green shaded box, Table 8 below), a decrease of -3.1% vs June 2021’s $38.8 billion (originally reported as $38.4 billion).

Roofing Services – Basic Tips for Roof Maintenance

In order to maintain the energy efficiency of your roof, you need to do routine maintenance. Roof Repair Alpharetta can perform regular maintenance to prevent costly problems, such as leaks and broken tiles. Moreover, routine maintenance helps to make your roof energy-efficient, preventing your home from losing valuable energy due to the inefficiency of your roof. It will also keep you from incurring additional costs and disruptions in your daily operations. This article outlines the basic tips for performing routine roofing maintenance.

roof maintenance

When performing a roof inspection, first check the interior of the building. Look for signs of water damage, such as stains and mold. If you notice peeling paint, it’s time for a more thorough inspection. It’s important to check all sides of the roof as leaks can travel sideways and through the building, causing extensive damage. You may also need to inspect the beams and trusses of the building on an annual basis. Likewise, you should also be vigilant in checking for any cracking, rot, or structural stress.
Then, you should check the gutters. They should be free of leaves and debris and should be shedding water. If the gutters are free of debris, you can check the roof for signs of damage. However, if you’re uncomfortable, don’t walk on the roof and avoid climbing on it. Most damage is visible from the exterior of the home. If the damage is extensive, you should hire a professional contractor. You can also have your roof inspected regularly to avoid major repairs and maintenance issues.
Inspect the building’s roof for signs of water damage. Signs of water damage include mold, stains, and peeling paint. Any of these should be cause for immediate attention. Sometimes, the leak can travel sideways and not directly above the building. If your building has heavy equipment or is subject to high snow load, you may need to inspect the trusses or beams on an annual basis. If you notice any signs of rotting or cracking, it’s time for a more intensive inspection of your roof.
Aside from repairing damaged areas on your roof, you should also check the interior of your building for signs of water damage. These include water stains, mold, and peeling paint. These should be the reasons for your annual roof inspection. While you might be able to repair the problem yourself, you should consult a professional to ensure the safety of your building. A good roof maintenance company will offer you a warranty on their work, which is essential for your peace of mind.
Before hiring a roofer, it’s important to know the specifics of the job. The contractor must be able to complete the job according to the manufacturer’s specifications and your budget. This means that you should keep a copy of your contract so that you can get the most out of it. It’s also wise to have all the necessary information available, such as warranty information. A professional roofing service should be able to provide you with the best services.
A professional roof maintenance service provider will be able to inspect your roof for any damage. A professional will have the necessary skills to perform this job efficiently. A professional will be able to document the damage and recommend a solution. He will also have a checklist of things that need to be repaired. These services can help you determine what repairs should be done, and which areas should be left to a professional. The service company will also be a good choice if you want to maintain the beauty and condition of your roof.
A professional roof maintenance service provider should carry out periodic roof inspections. He should check for leakages and ponds. In addition, he or she should clean debris from the gutters and drains. This will help ensure that the roof is safe and secure. The contractor should also make sure that any shingles are properly installed. If you have an issue with leaks, a professional should do the job. If you have a contractor, you should ask for their advice before hiring someone to do the work.
The service provider should be qualified to do roof maintenance on your property. The service provider should be able to do the job in a timely manner. If it is done in a proper manner, it will not cost too much. If you have no experience in roofing, you should contact a professional. It is not a bad idea to get the advice of an expert, especially if you can afford the service. The roofer should have a clear idea of the condition of the roof.

10 Mid-August Economic Nuggets

Top of mind for economic analysts these days is the question of how rapidly prices (or costs, from a different perspective) are moving, and in what direction. The construction sector, mainly on the residential side, has been plagued much of this year by extraordinarily large climbs in prices for forestry products. July’s Producer Price Index (PPI) results from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) show an abatement in this problem. Softwood lumber’s July PPI was -29.0% month to month and -16.3% over the latest three months. Nevertheless, it was ahead by a mighty +45.0% year over year; but in May, it had been +154% y/y.


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BPM Tips For Getting Specified by Architects

As a building product manufacturer (BPM) trying to get specified by architects may seem like a daunting task, but it doesn’t have to be. The key is to focus less on selling your products and focus more on building relationships with architects and specifiers. Position your company as a leading expert on the types of products you deliver and provide them with all the information they need when researching and selecting products to specify on their product.


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The U.S. and Canadian Inflation Story in Seven 1,000-Word (Standalone) Graphs

The seven (potentially) standalone graphs in this article show how inflation, according to the traditional Consumer Price Index (CPI) means of measurement, has been heating up in both the U.S. and Canada.


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A Simple Clear Construction Staffing Distress Indicator

Well before the pandemic, the construction sector was worrying over what was perceived as an acute shortage of labor. Much of the discussion on this topic over the past several years has been anecdotal. Or reference has been made to employment gains that have been less than they should be and unemployment rates that have sometimes turned spectacularly low.

But it would be better to find some easy-to-understand visual representation of the problem. It’s my hope that Graphs 1 through 5 below, making use of JOLTS data, fit the bill.

From the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS), for ‘all jobs’ and 14 major sub-sectors, I’ve taken ‘openings’ levels and ‘hires’ levels and calculated openings-to-hires ratios for every month back to July 2009, which was the first period of recovery after the ‘fiscal crisis’ recession (a.k.a., the Great Recession).

The openings-to-hires ratio essentially captures the degree to which vacant positions are being snapped up (a low ratio) or going begging (a high ratio).

To enable easy comparisons between industries, I’ve indexed their openings-to-hires ratios.

The indexing I’ve adopted takes the July 2009 value for each series and sets it equal to 100.0. (The number could just as easily be set equal to 1.0 but choosing 100 leaves more room for following numbers to move not only up, but also down, should that become the case.)

For each series, the value of each subsequent month is divided by the value in the base month (July 2009) and multiplied by 100.

Since all the series have the same starting value (July 2009 = 100.0), when a couple of them, or several of them, are shown on a graph, their movements over time can be readily compared.

In Graphs 1 through 5, I’ve stuck with only one-on-one comparisons.

The higher the curve, the greater the sought-after employee shortage distress.

From Graph 1, it’s apparent that the increase over time, since July 2009, in the openings-to-hires ratio for construction has far outpaced the increase in the openings-to-hires ratio for ‘all jobs’. (The openings-to-hires ratio will increase in an expanding economy.)

By the way, I must point out that the patterns apparent in Graphs 1 to 5 stay essentially the same even when the base period is shifted (e.g., if January 2015 is chosen = 100.0 rather than July 2009).

In Graphs 2 through 5, the worker shortage in construction is shown to be more severe than in the following: manufacturing; retail trade; transportation, warehousing, and utilities; and accommodation and food services.

As for nine of the other ten industrial sectors not set out graphically below, construction’s labor shortage is far more acute than in any of them except one.

The worst labor shortage in the U.S. is currently being experienced in another goods-producing as opposed to the services-producing corner of the economy, ‘mining and logging’.


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U.S. Home Building Up by One-Fifth; Canadian Up by Two-Fifths

The 14 graphs in this article set out how housing starts have been performing so far this year (i.e., through July) in the U.S. and Canada, nationally and by regions, states/provinces, and cities. There are also looks at the single-family home building market versus the multi-unit segment.  


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Our Top 10 Construction Blogs from 2021

As we reflect on the last year, it’s worth a look back at some of Autodesk’s most notable blog posts from 2021. Doing so not only gives us a chance to reflect on the topics that made waves throughout the year, but also provides an indication of what’s in store for the next 12 months.

So, dig in—this roundup features an array of topics and articles. You’ll discover top industry stats, meet AEC’s most innovative leaders, learn about data and cost management tech, and discover innovations in sustainable construction.

Whether you’re new to the blog or a long-time follower of Digital Builder, you’re bound to find something read-worthy below. 

Let’s dive in.

1. 100+ Construction Industry Statistics

Construction facts/stats can be incredibly helpful when you want to identify benchmarks, industry trends, and market opportunities. To help you surface interesting construction data, we’ve compiled a list of 100 statistics that give you a general overview of the state of the AEC industry, particularly in the areas of construction labor, operations, and technology. Needless to say, if you’re looking for a credible source of construction info, this post is one of the best places to start. Read article.

2. 40 Under 40: Champions of Construction 2021

In 2021, we released Autodesk’s annual 40 Under 40: Champions of Construction—a list of construction professionals doing remarkable things in their respective areas (and who happen to be under the age of 40). Sourced from hundreds of nominations from across the globe, this year’s list is comprised of a diverse group of individuals who demonstrated innovation, resilience, and creativity. If you’re looking to get inspired in your construction career and business, this list will certainly do the trick. View list.

3. New Report Reveals Data Strategy is a Key Advantage in Construction

It’s easy to agree that having a data strategy is important in the construction industry. But what exactly does a good data strategy look like? What does it mean? What does it take? To answer this, Autodesk and FMI published the report Harnessing the Data Advantage in Construction. This post does an excellent job summarizing the study’s key insights, and it offers advice on how to successfully launch a data strategy. Plus, the article comes with a nifty infographic featuring the report’s notable findings, making the info easy to understand. View report findings.

4. Reusing Our Way to a More Sustainable Future

Reusing things that would otherwise go to waste is proving to be a better alternative to traditional methods of sourcing building materials. Shannon Goodman, Executive Director of Lifecycle Building Center, lends her expert insights on the topic. Lifecycle Building Center is an organization that salvages building materials and directs them back to the community. In this post, Shannon shares some actionable steps on how construction firms can be more sustainable in their building practices. Learn more.

5. Essential Construction KPIs to Improve Profits and Productivity

The line “you can’t improve what you don’t measure” rings very true in the construction industry. Tracking the right KPIs is essential to ensuring that your projects are on track and that you’re meeting your objectives. This article serves as an excellent reference piece for the top KPIs you should be looking at. It lists the must-track metrics in areas like project safety, quality, performance, and employee management. You’ll also get tips on how to adopt, measure, and implement your KPIs successfully. Discover key metrics.

6. Construction Keynote: Autodesk Backs Customers as Solid Technology Partner [AU 2021]

Technology is now a staple both in the field and in the office. As more innovative tools carve their spot in the AEC industry, you need to ensure that you’re leveraging tech correctly. Jim Lynch, Senior Vice President & General Manager of Autodesk Construction Solutions led the Construction Keynote at Autodesk University 2021. This article breaks down the top takeaways. He highlights three ways that Autodesk can help you do just that. You’ll learn how Autodesk is connecting your data and how it streamlines much-needed collaboration. You’ll also learn the difference between a technology partner and a technology provider—and why one is favored over the other. Read key takeaways.

7. 6 Common Causes of Cost Overruns in Construction Projects

This post is actually from 2020, but continues to be a popular read in 2021 as cost control has become a unique challenge these last two years. Pandemic aside, this article’s relevance isn’t surprising considering cost overruns are all too common across construction projects globally. With just a third of projects coming within 10% of the budget, it’s no wonder so many AEC pros are seeking information on how to get costs under control. This post helps you do that by explaining the top 6 reasons that projects go over budget—and how to address them. Learn more.

8. Top 10 Construction Podcasts to Listen to Now

Podcasts have grown in popularity over the past year, and for good reason—they offer a convenient way for listeners to consume information. Whether you want to learn about current events or are looking to listen to interviews with thought leaders in your field, there’s likely a podcast that has what you need. If you’re looking for construction podcasts to check out, this article lists the top 10 construction-related podcasts you should listen to. From shows that tackle technology to podcasts that examine design and architecture, this post is packed with insightful and entertaining podcasts for anyone in AEC. Listen and learn.

9. Democratising Data and Improving Efficiency with a Single Source of Truth

Wessex Water is one of the leading water and sewage companies in England and Wales. In addition to providing their communities with excellent water services, the company also strives to manage the growing environmental, financial, and consumer demands facing the industry. To do that, Wessex Water is investing in construction technology and optimizing its workflows to improve project collaboration and outcomes. This post details the company’s journey and key learnings from its initiatives. Check it out and see if you can apply Wessex Water’s lessons in your own projects. 

10. Our Mission to Connect the Office & Field: Autodesk Build

Managing project stakeholders, data, budgets, and several other moving parts is a challenge that many construction teams face. At Autodesk, we’ve found that the best way to stay on top of projects is to centrally manage its components from one platform. Autodesk Build, a solution we launched in 2021, enables you to do just that. Read this article to learn more about Autodesk Build and the specific ways that it helps you and your teams function more smoothly and deliver better outcomes. 

Join us in The Big Room

We hope this roundup gives you plenty to think about and sheds light on insights you can use to plan for 2022 and beyond. If you’d like to discuss these findings, trends, and other topics, please join us in The Big Room, Autodesk’s community of construction professionals.

The Big Room gives you the opportunity to connect with like-minded folks to ask questions, discuss construction ideas, and more. See you there!

The post Our Top 10 Construction Blogs from 2021 appeared first on Digital Builder.

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Canada Achieves Foreign Trade Gains; U.S. Still Sinking

Canada’s foreign trade picture brightened considerably in June. The nation’s merchandise trade balance recorded its biggest surplus since before the 2008-2009 recession. Furthermore, there have now been four surpluses in the past six months. During the decade prior to this year, Canada’s monthly goods trade balance spent a lot of time below the zero x-axis (Graph 1).  (‘Merchandise’ trade is a fancier way of saying ‘goods’ as opposed to ‘services’ trade.)


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Stock Markets Speed Along, Oblivious to Blind Spots

U.S. Economy Stumbling Blocks

A year and a half into the coronavirus health crisis, the economies of the United States and Canada have been running into some stumbling blocks. In the United States, GDP growth in Q1 and Q2 of this year, at +6.3% and +6.5% respectively (quarter to quarter annualized), was looking pretty good, and not far out of line with the +7.0% forecast figure for the full year adopted by many analysts. But the third quarter has not been looking as sparky.


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